Sayanne Soselisa

 
Sayanne Soselisa

Host Institution

Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP)
Contact details

IMP
Dr. Bohrgasse 7
1030 Vienna
+43 1 79044 3525
sayanne.soselisa@imp.ac.at

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background and previous research experience

After completing a broad bachelor degree in Biology in Utrecht, the Netherlands, where I had the chance to follow courses from many biological fields, I chose to pursue a master in Molecular Medicine at Erasmus University Rotterdam. There, I did my masters’ project on the protein LGI2, and its expression during the postnatal development of the mouse cerebellum. This involved finding interaction partners for LGI2 using immune precipitation, and taking many confocal images of wild type and Lgi2 knockout brains, to investigate which cells express this protein and when, and how this affects localization of other proteins, and ultimately, to figure out how LGI2 influences development and connectivity within the cerebellum. 

Main areas of interest

While the brain (whether mouse or fly) consists of many neurons that act together to process sensory information and produce a (behavioural) output, my main interest lie in the smaller scale of single, or small groups of neurons. Understanding how these neurons influence their targets, and through this the behaviour of the animal, is a major motivation to study neurobiology.

FLiACT project

Dorsal Cluster Neurons (DCNs) are a group of neurons in the fly brain that are part of the visual system. Recent experiments in the Straw-lab have shown that these neurons are involved in regulating the balance between two behaviour types in response to conflicting visual stimuli: object approach and wide-field stabilization.
During my PhD project, I will use two-photon calcium imaging to gain insight in the connectivity of these neurons using different driver lines to activate and image subsets of neurons. Additionally, I aim to image dorsal cluster neuron activity in the behaving fly, while presenting conflicting visual stimuli.